Archive for 'History'

From slaughterhouse to schoolhouse

From slaughterhouse to schoolhouse

By Derrick Perkins It’s not quite striking pay dirt, but archeologists combing over the future site of the re-imagined Jefferson-Houston School may have found the remains of a long-buried slaughterhouse. An archeological survey conducted by URS, [...]

Wartime tragedy fuels tale of the high seas

Wartime tragedy fuels tale of the high seas

By Derrick Perkins Local author Stephen Hayes’ first novel isn’t strictly a Vietnam War story, but the tale is born from his time serving on a swift boat a continent away more than 40 years ago. [...]

Author documents life and times of gun-toting prosecutor

Author documents life and times of gun-toting prosecutor

By Derrick Perkins After scaring up a compendium of local ghost stories and detailing the Port City’s history in the District, Alexandria newshound Michael Lee Pope has turned to Northern Virginia’s seedy past in his latest [...]

Parker-Gray residents reshape home improvement guidelines

Parker-Gray residents reshape home improvement guidelines

Home improvement regulations long seen by Parker-Gray residents as onerous and overly restrictive are poised for an overhaul. Like their neighbors in the Old and Historic Alexandria District, residents in the Parker-Gray Historic District must adhere [...]

Out of the Attic: Establishing Ivy Hill Cemetery

Out of the Attic: Establishing Ivy Hill Cemetery

In the early 19th century, the Alexandria Common Council prohibited opening new cemeteries. As a result, many churches established new burial grounds in a cluster along Wilkes Street. Around the same time, about a mile beyond [...]

Out of the Attic: The ‘megastructure’ at Northern Virginia Community College

Out of the Attic: The ‘megastructure’ at Northern Virginia Community College

Established in 1964, Northern Virginia Technical College opened in autumn of 1965 in a warehouse at Bailey’s Crossroads. The following year, the school was renamed Northern Virginia Community College (NVCC or NOVA, colloquially). Over the next [...]

City marks Washington’s birthday

City marks Washington’s birthday

British redcoats and German mercenaries squared off against a mix of colonial militia and Virginia infantry on the grassy slopes of Fort Ward Park Sunday, part of the weekend long birthday celebrations for the city’s most [...]

Out of the Attic: Where’s the beef? On the corner of Cameron and Henry.

Out of the Attic: Where’s the beef? On the corner of Cameron and Henry.

Armour and Company, a slaughterhouse and meat packing business established in Chicago in the 1860s, had an operation in Alexandria at the beginning of the 20thcentury. By 1909, the Armour facility at the corner of King [...]

Out of the Attic: The Swann-Daingerfield mansion on Prince Street

Out of the Attic: The Swann-Daingerfield mansion on Prince Street

Around 1802, Thomas Swann, a prominent Alexandria attorney who also served as the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia, built a two-story house at the southeast corner of Prince and South Columbus streets. The [...]

Remembering slavery in a city built on bondage

Remembering slavery in a city built on bondage

As Alexandria continues to explore and tout its rich Civil War history during the sesquicentennial, historians say the role of free blacks, slaves and slavery won’t be forgotten. The Port City remains well known as home [...]