Man convicted of conspiracy to distribute heroin, fentanyl in city, Northern Virginia

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Man convicted of conspiracy to distribute heroin, fentanyl in city, Northern Virginia
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By Alexa Epitropoulos | [email protected]

Virginia man was convicted this week of a conspiracy to distribute heroin, fentanyl and furanyl fentanyl, Alexandria Commonwealth’s Attorney Bryan Porter announced in a news release.

An Alexandria jury convicted Anthony Terry, 59, of Dumfries, Virginia, on one count of conspiracy to distribute heroin, a felony; one count of conspiracy to distribute furanyl fentanyl, a second-offense felony; one count of possessing fentanyl with the intent to distribute it, a second offense felony and one count of possessing fentanyl with the intent to distribute it, a second offense felony. 

The jury recommended Terry serve 86 years in prison and pay a $225,000 fine. Terry will be sentenced on July 19 and is being held at the Alexandria Detention Center. 

Terry acted as a major part of the drug trafficking organization that sold heroin and fentanyl in the city and throughout Northern Virginia, evidence presented at trial revealed. Terry distributed more than a kilogram of opioids – the equivalent of 10,000 individual doses –  in the city between March 2016 to March 2017, according to a news release. The kilogram would have a street value of approximately $150,000.

Evidence at the trial also revealed Terry tested his heroin and fetanyl’s potentness on buyers, using their physical reactions to establish the efficacy of the drug.

Terry was previously convicted for distributing narcotics and possessing a firearm after being convicted of a felony. 

“The opioid crisis is a clear and present danger to communities across the country, and Alexandria is not immune. This case, in which a high-level, recidivist heroin and fentanyl dealer was held accountable for the human misery he has produced, is illustrative of a simple fact: the citizens of our city are aware of the opioid problem and are outraged by the actions of these complex drug organizations,” Porter said in a statement. “Drug trafficking organizations should heed the message sent by this jury: do not sell heroin or fentanyl in Alexandria. If you do, you will be held accountable for your actions.” 

This recent conviction reflects the city’s approach to the opioid crisis, which involves rehabilitating users and arresting those who are higher up the drug trafficking food chain. Porter, in his statement, reiterated that his office is working to establish a drug treatment court in collaboration with the city. 

 

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